A playthrough of Malibu Games’ 1993 license-based platformer for the SNES, Family Dog.

I have really vague memories of this this being on TV, but I certainly never watched it. The premise always seemed so mean – a puppy that just wants to be loved is abused incessantly. That’s the show. At least, that’s about all I can remember of it, and if this game is anything to go by, there wasn’t much else anyway.

You control the dog as his little boy owner tries to kill him (stage 1) until you get taken to the pound and have to ninja-scale a fortress prison (stage 2), only to then leap hundreds of feet above the ground being attacked by all sorts of irradiated looking things (stage 3), all to get back home to a family he loves, where the cycle begins anew (Congraturation! See you next game!).

Like a Lifetime movie. Except this makes me sad.

I really have no idea what else to say about Family Dog. It’s easy, it’s pretty repetitive and dull, and it’s not particularly fun. But, in all fairness, there’s nothing particularly terrible about it either. It’s like a somberly garnished glass of tap water. That sums it up perfectly.
____
No cheats were used during the recording of this video.

NintendoComplete ( punches you in the face with in-depth reviews, screenshot archives, and music from classic 8-bit NES games!

Visit for the latest updates!

Nguồn: https://phoenixpaintpros.com/

Xem thêm bài viết khác: https://phoenixpaintpros.com/game/

25 Comments

Rockspritex

July 7, 2020

Damn I had this game. I bought it at blockbuster

Reply

John Doe

July 7, 2020

Family Dog's creators took such great care making this epic game

Reply

SimSimiッ ➊❽

July 7, 2020

I finally found this game so long ago that I had played that I had even forgotten the name

Reply

Kevin R

July 7, 2020

I don't think I ever actually saw any episodes of the show itself when it aired (watched a few just now), but I remember seeing the SNES game running on a display in a Babbages in our local mall. They had a copy of Super Mario World running on a separate display. Super Mario World, I get. Buy why Family Dog? Maybe my memory is foggy though, because I also recall this same occasion as the first time I saw Super Mario World ever. But Family Dog wasn't exactly a launch title, so it seems odd that they would have been featured together and that I wouldn't have been familiar with the SNES at all. I also recall thinking that these didn't look like console games. They looked more like PC games running on high end hardware. I was like, that's Super Mario, but it looks way better than the games I have! I remember being impressed with the graphics in Family Dog too, but it's certainly not impressive to look at now. I could have sworn it had short cartoon cutscenes on the title screen, but I guess I was just watching the attract mode and thought the gameplay looked like cutscenes. It's strange what we remember sometimes, and how it doesn't always match up to reality.

I wonder how well this game sold back in the day. Besides rich kids who had nothing better to spend their money on, I can't imagine why anyone would pick this over other much better games.

Reply

KevinGrahamArt

July 7, 2020

I loved this cartoon. Sadly it never made it past the first season. Would love to see it come back or at least on blu Ray. I think I might do an animation cel/drawing of the dog on my YouTube channel. thanks for sharing

Reply

Tgr Tgr

July 7, 2020

I remember as a kid, I used to hate this godamn game so much

Reply

Rugal Bernstein

July 7, 2020

I thought this game was a fever dream I had as a kid but I just found an old cartridge of it with my other snes games.

Reply

RagingThunder

July 7, 2020

Wow, this game makes me so sad. Like, even though, I know this isn't real I just want to adopt that dog, away from their abusive owners. He can get better owners but he still loves his family. 🙁

Reply

Victor Honoret

July 7, 2020

I used to play this game when I was 7-8 years but I never undertood it. Lol

Good memories.

Reply

LainaT

July 7, 2020

I seem to remember the house levels being a lot longer before the dog pound level. And wasn't there a fetch mini-game where the dog and boy were outside and you had to avoid crashing in a pile of leaves?

Also the kid frikkin' scared me. Swear Chucky from Child's Play got his wish and reincarnated as THAT kid.

Reply

kuitlahuak rafael argumedo vera

July 7, 2020

I loved this game as a kid. It was very hard.

Reply

Timeman / Payten Lozano ALT.

July 7, 2020

FAMILY
dog

Reply

Coyotekins

July 7, 2020

I had this when i was a kid. Awesome game 😀

Reply

susanfit47

July 7, 2020

Steven Spielberg and Tim Burton were both involved in the production of the Family Dog TV series. It was originally just a single episode from a show called Amazing Stories, and CBS wanted to adapt it to a TV series. The series was such a production nightmare that it was cancelled before the last 3 episodes could get their animation finished. Needless to say, the show was a flop for not just flawed production, but the reception was negative over being such a cruel concept. Because of the buzz surrounding the "Amazing Stories" episode, NBC announced later that year (in '87) they'd be turning "Family Dog" into a weekly series. My memory's fuzzy, but I think the regime at NBC changed soon after. Or possibly Spielberg was bitter over the cancellation of "Amazing Stories" and opted not to continue with the network. Whatever the reason, the show didn't immediately happen… but reports persisted that it was in the works. The once-unemployed Brad Bird found himself in high demand, eventually taking a job on a new show called :The Simpsons", which became an instant success for Fox (leading to a tidal wave of short-lived animated sitcoms), Burton was drawing crowds in theaters and his films were huge renters on home video so it was little wonder when CBS announced the joint Steven Spielberg-Tim Burton produced prime-time animated series in May 1990 they'd be picking up the show — continuously associating it with Burton’s and Spielberg's names. CBS announced In early 1990, there was a newspaper-type ad for CBS with a huge picture of the Family Dog on the front, heralding "Steven Spielberg and Tim Burton present 'Family Dog!' Coming to CBS This Fall!'" Along with the pic of the pooch was a small story with some quotes from Spielberg and Burton describing the plot and genesis of the "Amazing Stories" episode. CBS ordered 13 episodes – a standard episode order for a new series – budgeted at $650,000 per episode. The series was scheduled to debut as a 1990-91 mid-season replacement on March 20, 1991 (and it was heavily promoted during the February 20, 1991 broadcast of the Grammy Awards), but the animation production wasn't completed in time for this premiere, ultimately it would be another 2+ years before "Family Dog" finally aired. Animation was having a renaissance at the time, "The Simpsons" garnering high ratings, MTV’s quirky "Liquid Television" in the works, and syndicated, weekday and Saturday morning children’s cartoons flooding the networks. Largely hyped due to the involvement of Spielberg, the series suffered various noted production delays that plagued the show. Further complicating matters, Burton was consumed with Edward Scissorhands and Spielberg was busy with Hook and numerous other projects, so neither was very hands-on with the initial production of Family Dog. It did not get past its original network order of 13 episodes. Only 10 episodes were finished and sent back from the Wang Film Productions animation house in Taiwan, but the producers were dissatisfied with the results, so they halted production on the final 3 episodes and outsourced the 10 episodes to Nelvana for many production problems, rewrites, and "fixes and completions", according to an Amblin rep. Unlike a film, trying to “fix” animation is a Herculean task which basically boils down to completely re-animating it. And presumably that’s exactly what happened. Family Dog became a money pit with a $650,000 per episode budget that swelled to around a million in the end (at a time when Saturday morning fare averaged $250,000 an episode).

Presumably because time had passed, none of the original voice actors from the Amazing Stories outing returned. Also, after 3 episodes were recorded and animated, Character actor Fred Coffin and Molly Cheek (It’s Garry Shandling’s Show) were cast as the parents. There are conflicting reports as to when exactly this occurred, but at some point around episode three, Spielberg decided to replace Coffin.

Spielberg and Burton decided to send the episodes to Nelvana in Canada, which was producing Burton's "Beetlejuice" as a Saturday Morning cartoon.

Meanwhile, there was a merchandising craze surrounding "The Simpsons" – everything from T-shirts and toys to CDs, with a vast array of unauthorized knock-offs floating around. Anticipating the success of the series, someone signed a deal with Applause, Inc. to produce plush dolls of the titular character, video games, T-shirts, pajamas, slippers, beach towels, even children’s dinner wear–to retail stores. As the show’s debut was pushed back repeatedly, all of this merchandise wound up gathering dust in warehouses before finally being relegated to bargain bins. "Family Dog" was rescheduled with a launch in October ’91, but when it became clear that that was unfeasible, it remained on their mid-season replacement list for the ’91-’92 season, but it still didn't happen. Unfortunately, the show would hit another snag in early ’92…

The series was part of a spate of attempts by major networks to develop eventually was lumped into a category of failed prime time animated shows to compete with the surprise success of Fox's "The Simpsons", alongside ABC's "Capitol Critters" and CBS's own "Fish Police" which was based on an 1980's independent comic book series of the same name, paired with "Scorch", a goofy sitcom starring a dragon puppet (which was frequently likened to A.L.F.), flopped during half of the 1991-92 season. All 4 shows were canceled in their 1st season.

In November 1992, the 10 completed and "fixed" episodes were finally handed over to CBS. It’s unclear whether the network was displeased with the show, distraught over the failure of "Fish Police", or merely annoyed at having to wait so long for the show after scheduling it (again and again), but CBS sat on the tapes for months, so the series was ultimately pushed back until 1993 as a summer replacement. Frederick Coffin was originally cast as the voice of Skip Binsford, but Spielberg decided to replace him with Martin Mull, after animation was completed on the 1st 3 episodes. But Burton and Spielberg were not happy with the quality of the finished show, so it was hidden away for a while after 10 episodes were shot (all episodes have a 1992 copyright date). In early June, 1993, CBS finally scheduled the show to air. New episodes that air on the networks from May to September are most generally being “burned off.” In other words, it was clear that CBS had given up on the show and had no intention of ordering more episodes.

The June 23 release of the episode, unsurprisingly, coincided with June 11 release of Spielberg’s latest film, "Jurassic Park". Family Dog received minuscule promotion and aired in hour-long blocks on Wednesday nights for five weeks from June through July, 1993. Scheduled opposite reruns of "Unsolved Mysteries", "Beverly Hills, 90210", "The Wonder Years" and "Doogie Howser, M.D.", viewers simply didn’t tune in (or perhaps even know it was finally airing), with the first 2 episodes ranking #40 and #42 out of 94 shows in the weekly Nielsen Ratings. The show was animated and produced by Nelvana and Amblin Television, and 2 major studios, Universal Television and Warner Bros. Television.

In retrospect, "Family Dog" is often considered to be a landmark production that, combined with films such as Don Bluth's "An American Tail" (1986) and "The Land Before Time" (1988) and Disney films like "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" (1988), "Oliver & Company" (1988) and "The Little Mermaid" (1989), led to the Disney Renaissance, which had films such as "Beauty and the Beast" (1991), "Aladdin" (1992) and "The Lion King" (1994). "Family Dog" is also notable as Spielberg's first animated project; he has followed up projects like Tiny Toon Adventures, Fievel's American Tails, Animaniacs, Freakazoid!, Pinky and the Brain, Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain, Toonsylvania, The Prince of Egypt, and CGI projects like Shrek. It comes fairly close in tone to being a "Beavis and Butt-head" knockoff. The animation harks back to the earliest days of "The Jetsons," and surely that's not intentional. =

Of the 13 episodes initially ordered, only 10 completed production, meaning that Family Dog does have 3 “lost episodes” that has yet to uncover any information on.

This game Family Dog was developed by Imagineering (who a string of odd licensed games under their belt, including The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends (Game Boy and Super NES versions), Attack of the Killer Tomatoes, Barbie, Barbie: Game Girl, Flight of the Intruder, Ghostbusters II, Ghoul School, Home Alone (Game Boy and Super NES versions), Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, The Ren & Stimpy Show: Space Cadet Adventures, The Ren & Stimpy Show: Buckeroo$!, The Simpsons NES trilogy including Bart Vs. The Space Mutants, Bart Vs. The World, Bartman Meets Radioactive Man, Bart Simpson's Escape From Camp Deadly, and Bart Vs. The Juggernauts, Swamp Thing, adaptations of game shows like Jeopardy!, Super Jeopardy!, and Family Feud, video games based on Star Trek, and Home Improvement) and released/published and distributed by THQ's Malibu Games label (although several sources has the 1991 copyright on the box, while the screen has the 1992 copyright) around the same time. It is based on the 1993 short-lived prime-time animated CBS series of the same name by Steven Spielberg and Tim Burton, which itself based on the season 2 episode of Amazing Stories called "The Family Dog".

Reply

WindowshadeCure

July 7, 2020

This show had a surprising amount of merchandise considering that it only lasted like 6 episodes. They had plush toys too. Must have had something to do with the fact that it was executive produced by Spielberg.

Reply

MFields2178

July 7, 2020

So basically you are a dog who is terrorized by this family and they abandon the dog into some doggy prison and the dog must get back to the family so he can be terrorized again? Oh and you can watch episodes of the show on YouTube.

Reply

ZadfrackGlutz Zesozose

July 7, 2020

It's like people only do things because they get paid and that's just really sad.

Reply

Victor 2017

July 7, 2020

esse jogo era foda!

Reply

KungFuFurby

July 7, 2020

I actually noticed that the music itself became interactive in two places: the dog pound (where each freed bird speeds up the tempo), and the last level (where the pitch increases the farther to the right you go). I usually didn't notice this so much in other SNES games.

Reply

Washu Hakubi

July 7, 2020

There are people who paid full retail for this and that is a mind blowing thought.

Reply

rcblazer

July 7, 2020

I remember beating this game after renting it for a weekend. I don't remember it being based on a cartoon, so it must not have lasted very long.

Reply

JohnnyOTGS

July 7, 2020

I am having a very hard time on who was the poorly behaved character, the Dog or the boy that I swear to Buddha looks a lot like Ludwig von Koopa?

Reply

darksideoftoast

July 7, 2020

The dog's idle animation is too adorable. Were his owners in the cartoon just as awful and abusive like this game makes them seem?

Reply

metal boo

July 7, 2020

i remember seeing a few episodes (vaguely)

Reply

PlayablePassion

July 7, 2020

This music is scary.

Reply

Leave a Reply